Just published "floc-block", a small npm package to help Express.js developers block Google's FLoC tracking: gitlab.com/EvanHahn/floc-block

And if you'd rather not install another tiny third-party module, I also wrote a quick guide showing how to do it yourself: evanhahn.com/block-googles-flo

@aral Inspired by your work, I put together a guide showing how to block FLoC in an Express app and an accompanying middleware package called floc-block.

(I worry that this message comes off as self-promotional, which couldn't be further from my goal! Just wanted to share that you inspired one developer to try to make this a little bit better.)

signal 

@jookia just want you to know that I haven't forgotten about this. I haven't gotten to it yet, though—apologies.

@aral I think it'd be cool to use a content-addressed system like IPFS to address this, but I haven't thought about it too much!

@shom @mike @cooper I'm not on the Android team but I'll bring this up next time we discuss SMS support. I fear that saying "thanks for the feedback" sounds dishonest, but I mean it: thanks for the feedback.

@shom @mike @cooper I work at Signal (but not on our Android team). FWIW, there have been lots of internal debates about whether to keep SMS support in the Android app. On one hand, it causes confusion for our users and is hard for us to maintain. On the other, it's a popular feature that many people love. No specific answers or promises here, but know that we've thought about this a lot.

signal 

@jookia hey, I work at signal but am reaching out unofficially. This is something we talked about a fair bit internally, but of course we're mostly a bunch of white guys too. I'll look into adding the "skip to content" link to our website—a much smaller ask, to be sure, but something I can at least do. Would love to hear more of your thoughts if you feel comfortable sharing them.

@nahuelwexd Ah, didn't know about that Telegram feature.

When an encrypted message is sent, we send it to ALL of your devices (each of which has its own encryption key). My understanding is that Telegram can only do a secret chat on one device for this reason.

Our e2e is also more resilient to certain kinds of attack, and we don't know who you're talking to. My understanding of other e2e services is that they DO know who you're talking to, just not what you say.

@hund I work at Signal and here are my two cents: Signal is incrementally better than the incumbents, but it's not perfect.

I think more people realize that corporations don't have users' best interests in mind. Switching to Signal is a big step in that regard even if our underlying technology is similar.

A decentralized or federated Signal (Matrix? Berty? Briar?) is my dream, but...baby steps!

(Note that I'm not speaking for Signal here; just my opinion.)

@stevenroose I work at Signal and here are my two cents: Signal is incrementally better than the incumbents, but it's not perfect.

I think more people realize that corporations don't have users' best interests in mind. Switching to Signal is a big step in that regard even if our underlying technology is similar.

A decentralized or federated Signal (Matrix? Berty? Briar?) is my dream, but...baby steps!

(Note that I'm not speaking for Signal here; just my opinion.)

@nahuelwexd I work at Signal, so I'm biased. But a few things make me prefer it over Telegram:

1. It's a nonprofit, not a company. That doesn't mean we're automatically perfect, but our incentives aren't the same as a business's.
2. Telegram's security is not as strong as Signal's. For one, secure chats aren't the default on Telegram; on Signal, all chats are secure and synced.
3. Signal's "Note to Self" feature is really useful IMO.

Again, I'm biased, but that's my take.

@gomez Lots of people are switching to Signal. (Disclaimer: I work at Signal.)

@mathew A great post. I agree with this basically 100%. (I can't speak to our organization's motivations too well, but I think this is our tack as well.)

Chicago pol 

@tessaracked I don't have an Instagram and don't know much about this...is there a good place to learn more?

@rd @lrvick @benk @alcinnz I work at Signal and here are my two cents: Signal is incrementally better than the incumbents, but it's not perfect.

I think more people realize that corporations don't have users' best interests in mind. Switching to Signal is a big step in that regard even if our underlying technology is similar.

A decentralized or federated Signal (Matrix? Berty? Briar?) is my dream, but...baby steps!

(Note that I'm not speaking for Signal here; just my opinion.)

@jgbarah As someone who works at Signal, thanks for posting this!!

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bigshoulders.city

bigshoulders.city is a Mastodon instance for Chicagoans current, former, and future. Its name comes from Carl Sandburg, who once compared ships pulling out to “mastodons, arising from lethargic sleep.” Our goal for bigshoulders.city is to build a community of friends and neighbors across the Windy City. Toot your pho place recommendations, meet-up ideas, pothole gripes, creative dibs, and cross-town baseball taunts—whatever you want, as long it abides by our short and sweet content policy.